Monday, July 31, 2006

I've been celiac for almost a year now... and I'm finally adjusting a little. I was a prolific baker before and now, not so much. I am however getting better. I only use the 4-flour bean mix for my flour (from Gluten Free Gourmet) and I've gotten really good at adapting recipes. I made my first loaf of bread that was shaped like wheat, baked on a breadstone like wheat and even had a wheaty, savory taste. The texture was definitely not a carbon copy of wheat, but it's pretty darn good considering it's gluten free. I'd say at least as good as the Bob's Red Mill mix... This is adapted from Wendy Wark’s Living Healthy with Celiac Disease (AnAffect, 1998)

  • 2¼ teaspoons rapid rise yeast
  • 2/3 cup warm water (105F-115F)
  • 2 tablespoon sugar
  • 2½ cups Gluten-Free Flour (+/-)
  • 2 teaspoons unflavored dry gelatin
  • 2½ teaspoons xanthan gum
  • ¼ cup instant non-fat dry milk powder
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ½ teaspoon ascorbic acid
  • 3 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 2 eggs
Combine yeast, sugar and water. Let stand until foamy, about 5 minutes. Meanwhile, combine all dry ingredients in bowl, mix briefly on low. Add oil and eggs, mix in and then add yeast water. You may have to add more flour to get the consistency right, you want soft dough not cake batter. Beat 2 minutes on high. Remove from mixer, with flour dusted hands take out of bowl. Shape into desired shape, place on well-cornmeal-dusted peal. Cover with bowl to rise until doubled. Meanwhile, preheat oven with baking stone to 375°. When bread is doubled, slash top and place in oven for 40 minutes or until golden brown and hollow sounding on the bottom. Alternatively the center should register 165°.

This bread is great textured and the crust even stays crunchy!

If you need the proportions for the flour mix: 3 parts tapioca starch, 3 parts corn starch, 2 parts garfava flour, 1 part sorghum flour. All by volume.

1 comment:

Damon said...

This is a great idea! My mom was diagnosed with celiac 7 years ago, and she had such a hard time finding meals that she could make and enjoy. I remember many nights of frustrated cooking and bland flavored meals. Celiac is a growing problem in this country (I seem to have lucked out and do not have Celiac, but my sister just had a positive antibody test)and its unfortunate that there aren't many options on the store shelves. I'll pass this site on to my mom and I'm sure she would be happy to add some of her recepie successes.